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Author Topic: 1942 bootleg pinout  (Read 5378 times)
Shagma
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« on: November 28, 2005, 05:06:57 PM »

Hi there..
Great site!!!
I'm new to this forum.
I'm a collector from Norway, and I just got my hands on a 1942 bootleg pcb.
The PCB is a 22-pin, but there exists two different 1942 bootleg pcb's with 22-pin.
Thanks to this site, I was able to compare my pcb, and It's the same as shown in  picture "1942bootlegA"
I need to make a Jamma connector, but I'm afraid of using the wrong pinout. According to crazykong.com there are two different pinout schemes..

Any ideas???

Many thanks!!!

Shagma

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tim
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2005, 05:21:26 PM »

Welcome to the site!

You'll definitely want to test your PCB with a volt meter to see which pinout you have since they're very different and if you pick the wrong one you will certainly fry something. The best way to tell for sure is to put your meter on the "Ohms" setting and compare the pinouts to your board. Pick a pin that says it should be +5v and put one lead on that pin. Put the other lead on the upper right pin (with the notch facing up) of any EPROM on your board. The upper right pin of any EPROM there will be +5v. If you have 0 ohms or a very small amount like .002-.005 ohms, then you have a match for that pin. If you have a lot of resistance, then you do not have a match. You should also test the ground pins. The lower left pin of your EPROMs will be ground.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2005, 08:13:45 PM by tim » Logged
Shagma
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2005, 05:31:13 PM »

Hi Tim!
Many thanks for your help..
I will check it out as soon as I get my voltmeter back from my friend...

I must admit I'm a newcomer to fixing pcb's, but I have just started making my own jamma connections, and I'm eager to learn more. I hope this site is perfect for that..

I started collecting cabinets 2 1/2 years ago, and I know have 4 coctails and 2 upright, as well as over 50 pcb's. Most of my pcb's are working fine, but I'm looking forward to start fixing the others..

Sincerly

Shagma
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tim
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2005, 08:09:55 PM »

Sure, you're welcome.
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vaxx
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« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2008, 04:36:48 AM »

you can work out the pinouts reasonably easy if you are patient.

General JAMMA pcb harnes making 101


+++++++++++++++++++
++++++ Warning ++++++
+++++++++++++++++++


I'm not responsible if you fry a pcb.
Take the proper care when attempting anything written below.
If you are having your first attempt, please use a pcb that has little value.
Thankyou





Get a black marker and trace the ground line from a known ic back to the edge connector. Do the same with a 5v pin with a red marker.

This gives you the basics for harness. You can run the pcb by wiring this up to the appropriate jamma connector fingerboard position.

Now attach a wire to one of the colours. Fire up the pcb. Assuming that you aren't trying to pcb that needs other voltages too.

I'm also assuming you have the correct monitor connected correctly.

You can probe each pin with either a logic probe or the colour you picked.
If you get one of the correct colours you should be able to make out a picture.
With the probe you will hear a steady signal the is either high or low pulsing fast. This is good. Write the pin number down. Now do the same with the other two colours.
You can also distinguish the sync pin after a bit of practice. You should see a rolling diagonal line on the screen. If you have used a probe a bit, you should be able to pick the tone/pulse of the probe (frequency of the sound/led's  is related to the signal waveform)
If you are probing with the sync wire, you will hear when you probe a colour pin or the monitor will go blank and quiet down when you hit the sync pin.


After doing this for all colour and sync pins (assuming you have a comp sync pcb, separate sync ( h sync / v sync) is a little harder. sometimes you can just put both signals into the comp input of the monitor, other times you need a sync combining circuit. Plenty floating around on the net.. Doesn't need to be covered here.) you should have a picture, might be a need a bit of colour swapping to look right Cheesy

After this point it's a matter of figuring out the 12v's for the sound. You can trace it back from the amp.  Then speakers wires. You can solder one to ground and use the other to probe the pins or you can trace the amp circuit out

To figure out the pinout, use a grounded wire to probe the pins and see what happens. wire each one up to the corresponding pin until you have the coins, service and all player controls.

Happy gaming
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